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Cisco Switch Vlan Configuration Step By Step Pdf 31



This guide is also valid for the 2960X models, their End-of-Support Date is October 2026. However their End-of-Sale Date is October 2021, but you may still be able to buy used units.The following provides a simple step-by-step guide to follow along.




cisco switch vlan configuration step by step pdf 31


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To clear the switch configuration we need to delete two files. These are the config.text and vlan.dat file.If you want to keep the VLAN configuration for example you can simply skip the second step and only delete the config.text file.


After the reboot is done you should be greeted with the initial configuration dialogue:switch: bootLoading "flash:c2960s-universalk9-mz.122-58.SE2.bin"...--- System Configuration Dialog ---Enable secret warning----------------------------------In order to access the device manager, an enable secret is requiredIf you enter the initial configuration dialog, you will be prompted for the enable secretIf you choose not to enter the intial configuration dialog, or if you exit setup without setting the enable secret,please set an enable secret using the following CLI in configuration mode-enable secret 0 ----------------------------------Would you like to enter the initial configuration dialog? [yes/no]:% Please answer 'yes' or 'no'.


With the improved performance and filtering resulting from the use of switches, there is a temptation to create large Layer 2 topologies and add lots of nodes, but this creates a large broadcast domain. The problem is that all devices on a network (computers, printers, switching equipment, etc.) generate broadcast and multicast frames that traverse the entire broadcast domain, competing with data traffic for bandwidth. Much of this traffic is for management of the network and includes protocols for address resolution (ARP), dynamic host configuration (DHCP), spanning tree (STP), and an assortment of Windows tasks. Figure 4-3 illustrates the potential difficulty. Assume that PC1 has generated the following requests: ARP, Windows registration, and DHCP.


Note that both of the switches have the same VLAN since, in the absence of any configuration changes, switches from the same vendor will have the same numbering convention. Nonlocal network traffic must be sent to the router for forwarding. Routers will not forward Layer 2 unicast, multicast and broadcast frames. VLANs provide a very similar logical topology in that nodes within a VLAN share a common addressing scheme and that nonlocal traffic (traffic destined for nodes on a different VLAN) must be sent to the router for forwarding. By creating an extra VLAN on one of the switches and removing the other, Figure 4-6 can now be redrawn as shown in Figure 4-7.


So, on the trunk ports, a trunking protocol is run that allows the VLAN information to be included in each frame as it travels over the trunk line. For configuration, there are generally two steps: converting the port to trunk mode and determining the encapsulation (trunking protocol) to be used.


One of these items is the default configuration mode of the ports on the switch. Most switch ports will wind up connected to computers and so will act as access ports. What is not obvious is that on many devices, the default configuration is not access, but dynamic. This means that the port is willing to negotiate the mode of operation. If two switches are connected together, and one switch is configured with a trunk port, it is often the case that it will generate dynamic trunking protocol messages. Once received, this message may cause the second switch to convert its port to a trunk automatically. This is shown in Figure 4-22.


!Management IP is assigned to Vlan 1 by defaultaccess-switch1(config)# interface vlan 1access-switch1(config-if)# ip address 10.1.1.200 255.255.255.0access-switch1(config-if)# exitaccess-switch1(config)#


access-switch1(config)# interface range fa 0/1-2access-switch1(config-if-range)# switchport mode accessaccess-switch1(config-if-range)# switchport access vlan 2access-switch1(config-if-range)# exit


access-switch1(config)# interface range fa 0/3-4access-switch1(config-if-range)# switchport mode accessaccess-switch1(config-if-range)# switchport access vlan 3access-switch1(config-if-range)# exit


The above are some steps that can be followed for basic set-up of a Cisco switch. Of course there are more things you can configure (such as SNMP servers, NTP, AAA, Vlan trunking protocol, 802.1q Trunk ports, Layer 3 inter-vlan routing etc) but those depend on the requirements of each particular network.


access-switch1# show run (Displays the current running configuration)access-switch1# show interfaces (Displays the configuration of all interfaces and the status of each one)access-switch1# show vlan (Displays all vlan numbers, names, ports associated with each vlan etc)access-switch1# show interface status (Displays status of interfaces, speed, duplex etc)access-switch1# show mac address-table (Displays current MAC address table and which MAC address is learned on each interface)


Ron, yes the tutorial will apply to your case as well. The simplest configuration is to leave all ports in the default Vlan 1 (i.e do not create any VLANs on the switch) and just connect your modem and Access Points to the switch.


The basic initial configuration of the MS425 is just as simple as any other model of MS switch. The links below provide additional information and instructions relating to each step in getting the device setup and configured for the first time.


The active-backup, balance-tlb, and balance-alb modes do not require any specific configuration of the network switch. However, other bonding modes require configuring the switch to aggregate the links. For example, Cisco switches requires EtherChannel for modes 0, 2, and 3, but for mode 4, the Link Aggregation Control Protocol (LACP) and EtherChannel are required.


The first configuration we'll look at builds on where we left off in the previous getting started guide. The firewall has Layer 3 interfaces and we're now going to change the trust interface so it can communicate with a trunked switch interface.


The difference between a regular, or access, switchport configuration and a trunked switchport, is that the access port will not tamper with the Ethernet header with any packets, whereas a trunk port will attach a VLAN tag in the form of a IEEE 802.1Q header to packets. This ensures that packets retain VLAN information outside the switch and should be treated as different LAN networks by the next host receiving these packets.


This procedure assumes that the zones are already created on the system. Thesteps to create zones and to assign interfaces to the zones arenot covered in this procedure. For more information about zone configuration, refer toChapter 17, Planning and Configuring Non-Global Zones (Tasks), in Oracle Solaris 11.1 Administration: Oracle Solaris Zones, Oracle Solaris 10 Zones, and Resource Management.


You are not required to configure the LAB 124-C Switch, and you will not be able to access it in this practice skills assessment activity.All IOS device configurations should be completed from a direct terminal connection to the device console. In addition, many values that are required to complete the configurations have not been given to you. In those cases, create the values that you need to complete the requirements. For values that have been supplied to you, they must be entered exactly as they appear in order for you to get full credit for your configuration.You will practice and be assessed on the following skills:Configuration of initial IOS device settingsDesign and calculation of IPv4 addressingConfiguration of IOS device interfaces including IPv4 and IPv6 addressing when appropriateAddressing of network hosts with IPv4 and IPv6 addressesEnhancing device security, including configuration of the secure transport protocol for remote device managementConfiguration of a switch virtual management interfaceRequirements by device:CS Department router:Configuration of initial router settingsInterface configuration and IPv4 and IPv6 addressingDevice security enhancement, or device hardeningSecure transport for remote configuration connections as covered in the labs and Packet Tracers in the course.LAB 214-A Switch:- Enabling basic remote management by Telnet- PC and Server hosts:


You are not required to configure the First Floor Switch, and you will not be able to access it in this practice skills assessment activity.All IOS device configurations should be completed from a direct terminal connection to the device console. In addition, many values that are required to complete the configurations have not been given to you. In those cases, create the values that you need to complete the requirements. For values that have been supplied to you, they must be entered exactly as they appear in order for you to get full credit for your configuration.You will practice and be assessed on the following skills:Configuration of initial IOS device settingsDesign and calculation of IPv4 addressingConfiguration of IOS device interfaces including IPv4 and IPv6 addressing when appropriateAddressing of network hosts with IPv4 and IPv6 addressesEnhancing device security, including configuration of the secure transport protocol for remote device managementConfiguration of a switch virtual management interfaceRequirements by device:Building 1 router:Configuration of initial router settingsInterface configuration and IPv4 and IPv6 addressingDevice security enhancement, or device hardeningSecure transport for remote configuration connections as covered in the labs and Packet Tracers in the course.Second Floor Switch:- Enabling basic remote management by Telnet- PC and Server hosts:IPv4 full addressingIPv6 addressingAddressing TableDeviceInterfaceIP Address/MaskDefault GatewayBuilding 1G0/0192.168.1.126/27(SM: 255.255.255. 224)N/A2001:db8:acad:a::1/64N/Afe80::1N/AG0/1192.168.1.158/28(SM: 255.255.255. 240)N/A2001:db8:acad:b::1/64N/Afe80::1N/ASecond Floor SwitchSVI192.168.1.157/28(SM: 255.255.255.240)192.168.1.158Host 1NIC192.168.1.97/27(SM: 255.255.255.224)192.168.1.1262001:db8:acad:a::ff/64FE80::1Host 2NIC192.168.1.98/27(SM: 255.255.255.224)192.168.1.1262001:db8:acad:a::15/64FE80::1Host 3NIC192.168.1.145/28(SM: 255.255.255.240)192.168.1.1582001:db8:acad:b::ff/64FE80::1ServerNIC192.168.1.146/28(SM: 255.255.255.240)192.168.1.1582001:db8:acad:b::15/64FE80::1InstructionsStep 1: Determine the IP Addressing Scheme.Design an IPv4 addressing scheme and complete the Addressing Table based on the following requirements. Use the table to help you organize your work.


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