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45k Polish From Cloud.txt


In April 2016, customer data obtained from the streaming app known as "17" appeared listed for sale on a Tor hidden service marketplace. The data contained over 4 million unique email addresses along with IP addresses, usernames and passwords stored as unsalted MD5 hashes.




45k Polish From Cloud.txt


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In late 2011, a series of data breaches in China affected up to 100 million users, including 7.5 million from the gaming site known as 17173. Whilst there is evidence that the data is legitimate, due to the difficulty of emphatically verifying the Chinese breach it has been flagged as "unverified". The data in the breach contains usernames, email addresses and salted MD5 password hashes and was provided with support from dehashed.com. Read more about Chinese data breaches in Have I Been Pwned.


In 2016, the site dedicated to helping people hack email and online gaming accounts known as Abusewith.us suffered multiple data breaches. The site allegedly had an administrator in common with the nefarious LeakedSource site, both of which have since been shut down. The exposed data included more than 1.3 million unique email addresses, often accompanied by usernames, IP addresses and plain text or hashed passwords retrieved from various sources and intended to be used to compromise the victims' accounts.


In October 2021, security researcher Bob Diachenko discovered an exposed database he attributed to ActMobile, the operators of Dash VPN and FreeVPN. The exposed data included 1.6 million unique email addresses along with IP addresses and password hashes, all of which were subsequently leaked on a popular hacking forum. Although usage of the service was verified by HIBP subscribers, ActMobile denied the data was sourced from them and the breach has subsequently been flagged as "unverified".


In November 2018, security researcher Bob Diachenko identified an unprotected database hosted by data aggregator "Adapt". A provider of "Fresh Quality Contacts", the service exposed over 9.3M unique records of individuals and employer information including their names, employers, job titles, contact information and data relating to the employer including organisation description, size and revenue. No response was received from Adapt when contacted.


In September 2016, data allegedly obtained from the Chinese gaming website known as Aipai.com and containing 6.5M accounts was leaked online. Whilst there is evidence that the data is legitimate, due to the difficulty of emphatically verifying the Chinese breach it has been flagged as "unverified". The data in the breach contains email addresses and MD5 password hashes. Read more about Chinese data breaches in Have I Been Pwned.


In December 2016, a huge list of email address and password pairs appeared in a "combo list" referred to as "Anti Public". The list contained 458 million unique email addresses, many with multiple different passwords hacked from various online systems. The list was broadly circulated and used for "credential stuffing", that is attackers employ it in an attempt to identify other online systems where the account owner had reused their password. For detailed background on this incident, read Password reuse, credential stuffing and another billion records in Have I Been Pwned.


In August 2019, Audi USA suffered a data breach after a vendor left data unsecured and exposed on the internet. The data contained 2.7M unique email addresses along with names, phone numbers, physical addresses and vehicle information including VIN. In a disclosure statement from Audi, they also advised some customers had driver's licenses, dates of birth, social security numbers and other personal information exposed.


In January 2023, 1.4M records from the Autotrader online vehicle marketplace appeared on a popular hacking forum. Autotrader stated that the "data in question relates to aged listing data that was generally publicly available on our site at the time and open to automated collection methods". The data contained 20k unique email addresses alongside physical addresses and phone numbers of dealers and vehicle details including VIN numbers. The data was provided to HIBP by a source who requested it be attributed to "IntelBroker".


In June 2016, a data breach allegedly originating from the social website Badoo was found to be circulating amongst traders. Likely obtained several years earlier, the data contained 112 million unique email addresses with personal data including names, birthdates and passwords stored as MD5 hashes. Whilst there are many indicators suggesting Badoo did indeed suffer a data breach, the legitimacy of the data could not be emphatically proven so this breach has been categorised as "unverified".


In August 2022, millions of records from Mexican bank "Banorte" were publicly dumped on a popular hacking forum including 2.1M unique email addresses, physical addresses, names, phone numbers, RFC (tax) numbers, genders and bank balances. Banorte have stated that the data is "outdated", although have not yet indicated how far back it dates to. Anecdotal feedback from HIBP subscribers suggests the data may date back 8 years to 2014.


In June 2011 as part of a final breached data dump, the hacker collective "LulzSec" obtained and released over half a million usernames and passwords from the game Battlefield Heroes. The passwords were stored as MD5 hashes with no salt and many were easily converted back to their plain text versions.


In February 2014, Bell Canada suffered a data breach via the hacker collective known as NullCrew. The breach included data from multiple locations within Bell and exposed email addresses, usernames, user preferences and a number of unencrypted passwords and credit card data from 40,000 records containing just over 20,000 unique email addresses and usernames.


In May 2017, the Bell telecommunications company in Canada suffered a data breach resulting in the exposure of millions of customer records. The data was consequently leaked online with a message from the attacker stating that they were "releasing a significant portion of Bell.ca's data due to the fact that they have failed to cooperate with us" and included a threat to leak more. The impacted data included over 2 million unique email addresses and 153k survey results dating back to 2011 and 2012. There were also 162 Bell employee records with more comprehensive personal data including names, phone numbers and plain text "passcodes". Bell suffered another breach in 2014 which exposed 40k records.


In September 2014, the online game Bin Weevils suffered a data breach. Whilst originally stating that only usernames and passwords had been exposed, a subsequent story on DataBreaches.net indicated that a more extensive set of personal attributes were impacted (comments there also suggest the data may have come from a later breach). Data matching that pattern was later provided to Have I Been Pwned by @akshayindia6 and included almost 1.3m unique email addresses, genders, ages and plain text passwords.


In June 2014, the search engine optimisation forum Black Hat World had three quarters of a million accounts breached from their system. The breach included various personally identifiable attributes which were publicly released in a MySQL database script.


In approximately March 2017, the file sharing website Bolt suffered a data breach resulting in the exposure of 995k unique user records. The data was sourced from their vBulletin forum and contained email and IP addresses, usernames and salted MD5 password hashes. The site was previously reported as compromised on the Vigilante.pw breached database directory.


In December 2018, the Slovak website for watching movies online for free Bombuj.eu suffered a data breach. The incident exposed over 575k unique email addresses and passwords stored as unsalted MD5 hashes. No response was received from Bombuj.eu when contacted about the incident.


In December 2019, a large collection of data from Nigerian gambling company Surebet247 was sent to HIBP. Alongside the Surebet247, database backups from gambling sites BetAlfa, BetWay, BongoBongo and TopBet was also included. Further investigation implicated betting platform provider BtoBet as being the common source of the data. Impacted data included user records and extensive information on gambling histories.


In early 2022, a collective known as IT Army whose stated goal is to "completely de-anonymise most Russian users by leaking hundreds of gigabytes of databases" published over 30GB of data allegedly sourced from Russian courier service CDEK. The data contained over 19M unique email addresses along with names and phone numbers. The authenticity of the breach could not be independently established and has been flagged as "unverfieid".


In approximately mid-2015, the forum for CheapAssGamer.com suffered a data breach. The database from the IP.Board based forum contained 445k accounts including usernames, email and IP addresses and salted MD5 password hashes.


In mid-2011, data was allegedly obtained from the Chinese engineering website known as Civil Online and contained 7.8M accounts. Whilst there is evidence that the data is legitimate, due to the difficulty of emphatically verifying the Chinese breach it has been flagged as "unverified". The data in the breach contains email and IP addresses, user names and MD5 password hashes. Read more about Chinese data breaches in Have I Been Pwned.


In April 2021, the market research surveys company ClearVoice Surveys had a publicly facing database backup from 2015 taken and redistributed on a popular hacking forum. The data included 15M unique email addresses across more than 17M rows of data that also included names, physical and IP addresses, genders, dates of birth and plain text passwords. ClearVoice Surveys advised they were aware of the breach and confirmed its authenticity.


In February 2017, hundreds of thousands of records from the Coachella music festival were discovered being sold online. Allegedly taken from a combination of the main Coachella website and their vBulletin-based message board, the data included almost 600k usernames, IP and email addresses and salted hashes of passwords (MD5 in the case of the message board). 041b061a72


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