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Covering The Amp; 39;60s: George Lois, The Esquire Era Do Discount Faxversand


Covering The '60s: George Lois, The Esquire Era




Introduction




The 1960s were a decade of radical change, innovation, and creativity in many fields, including art, music, fashion, and media. One of the most influential and provocative figures of this era was George Lois, a graphic designer who transformed the way magazines communicated with their audiences through his bold and daring cover designs for Esquire magazine. In this article, we will explore who George Lois was, what Esquire magazine was, how Lois revolutionized magazine cover design, and what impact and legacy his work has left on the world of design and culture.




Covering The amp; 39;60s: George Lois, The Esquire Era Do discount faxversand



Who is George Lois?




George Lois was born in 1931 in New York City to Greek immigrant parents. He grew up in a poor neighborhood in the Bronx, where he developed a passion for art and drawing. He attended the High School of Music and Art, where he met many other talented young artists who would later become his collaborators and friends. He then studied at Pratt Institute, but dropped out after two years to pursue a career in advertising.


Lois began working as a junior designer at CBS in 1950, where he learned the basics of graphic design and typography. He then moved to various advertising agencies, where he created memorable campaigns for clients such as Xerox, MTV, Tommy Hilfiger, and Jiffy Lube. He also co-founded his own agency, Papert Koenig Lois, in 1960, which was one of the first independent and creative agencies in the industry.


What is Esquire magazine?




Esquire magazine was founded in 1933 as a men's magazine that focused on fashion, culture, politics, and entertainment. It was known for its sophisticated and witty tone, its high-quality writing and photography, and its diverse and influential contributors. Some of the famous writers who wrote for Esquire include Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Norman Mailer, Truman Capote, Tom Wolfe, and Gay Talese.


Esquire magazine also had a reputation for being innovative and experimental in its design and layout. It hired some of the best art directors and designers in the business, such as Henry Wolf, Robert Benton, Sam Antupit, and George Lois. These designers pushed the boundaries of visual communication and created some of the most iconic and memorable covers in magazine history.


How did Lois revolutionize magazine cover design?




Lois joined Esquire magazine as a freelance art director in 1962. He was given complete creative freedom to design the covers as he saw fit. He decided to use the cover as a powerful tool to convey a message, a story, or an idea that would capture the attention and curiosity of the readers. He also wanted to challenge the conventions and expectations of magazine cover design at the time, which were often bland, boring, or predictable.


Lois used a variety of techniques and elements to create his covers. He used photography, illustration, collage, typography, color, symbolism, humor, irony, and satire. He also used celebrities, historical figures, and cultural icons as his subjects, but often in unexpected or controversial ways. He also used visual metaphors, references, and allusions to convey deeper meanings and messages. He often created covers that were provocative, shocking, or controversial, but also witty, clever, and memorable.


Lois designed 92 covers for Esquire magazine between 1962 and 1972. He worked with some of the best photographers and illustrators in the business, such as Carl Fischer, Melvin Sokolsky, Art Kane, and Robert Weaver. He also collaborated with some of the editors and writers of Esquire, such as Harold Hayes, Clay Felker, and David Newman. He often came up with the cover ideas himself, or based them on the articles or themes of the magazine. He also had to deal with the challenges and limitations of printing technology, censorship, and distribution at the time.


The most iconic covers by Lois




Lois created many memorable and influential covers for Esquire magazine, but here are some of the most iconic ones:


Muhammad Ali as Saint Sebastian (April 1968)




This cover shows the legendary boxer Muhammad Ali posing as Saint Sebastian, a Christian martyr who was shot with arrows by Roman soldiers. The cover was inspired by a painting by Andrea Mantegna, a Renaissance artist. The cover was a commentary on Ali's refusal to serve in the Vietnam War, which resulted in him being stripped of his boxing title and facing imprisonment. The cover also symbolized Ali's courage, faith, and resilience in the face of persecution and injustice.


Andy Warhol drowning in a can of soup (May 1969)




This cover shows the pop artist Andy Warhol sinking in a giant can of Campbell's tomato soup. The cover was a parody of Warhol's famous series of paintings of Campbell's soup cans, which were a critique of consumerism and mass culture. The cover also suggested that Warhol was drowning in his own fame and success, or that he was being consumed by his own creation.


Richard Nixon being made up as a clown (August 1970)




This cover shows the president Richard Nixon sitting in front of a mirror while a makeup artist applies clown makeup on his face. The cover was a satire of Nixon's image and reputation as a dishonest and corrupt politician. The cover also implied that Nixon was putting on a show for the public, or that he was hiding his true intentions and motives behind a mask.


Sonny Liston as Santa Claus (December 1963)




This cover shows the boxer Sonny Liston wearing a Santa Claus hat and beard. The cover was a contrast between Liston's image as a fearsome and intimidating fighter and Santa Claus's image as a jolly and benevolent figure. The cover also challenged the racial stereotypes and prejudices that Liston faced as a black athlete in a predominantly white society.


Germaine Greer as a sexy librarian (October 1971)




This cover shows the feminist writer Germaine Greer posing as a seductive librarian. The cover was a homage to Greer's book The Female Eunuch, which was a groundbreaking work on women's liberation and sexuality. The cover also played with the cliché of the librarian as a repressed and conservative woman who secretly desires to be wild and adventurous.


The impact and legacy of Lois's work




Lois's work for Esquire magazine had a huge impact on the world of design and culture. His covers were not only visually stunning and captivating, but also intellectually stimulating and socially relevant. His covers reflected the zeitgeist of the 1960s, capturing the mood, events, issues, and personalities of the decade. His covers also influenced other designers and publications, who adopted his style or tried to emulate his success. His covers also challenged social and political issues through his covers, such as racism, sexism, war, violence, religion, and censorship. His covers also inspired many people to think critically, creatively, and independently about the world around them.


Lois's work for Esquire magazine also remains relevant and inspiring today. His covers are still widely recognized and admired by designers and audiences alike. His covers are still exhibited in museums and galleries around the world. His covers are still studied and analyzed by scholars and critics. His covers are still referenced and parodied by other media and artists. His covers are still examples of excellence and innovation in design and communication.


Conclusion




George Lois was one of the most influential and provocative graphic designers of the 20th century. He revolutionized magazine cover design through his work for Esquire magazine in the 1960s. He created some of the most iconic and memorable He created some of the most iconic and memorable covers in magazine history, which reflected, influenced, and challenged the culture and society of his time. He also set a high standard and a new direction for design and communication, which still resonates and inspires today. George Lois was truly a master of covering the '60s.


FAQs





  • What was George Lois's background and education?



George Lois was born in 1931 in New York City to Greek immigrant parents. He grew up in a poor neighborhood in the Bronx, where he developed a passion for art and drawing. He attended the High School of Music and Art, where he met many other talented young artists who would later become his collaborators and friends. He then studied at Pratt Institute, but dropped out after two years to pursue a career in advertising.


  • What was Esquire magazine and what did it cover?



Esquire magazine was founded in 1933 as a men's magazine that focused on fashion, culture, politics, and entertainment. It was known for its sophisticated and witty tone, its high-quality writing and photography, and its diverse and influential contributors. Some of the famous writers who wrote for Esquire include Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Norman Mailer, Truman Capote, Tom Wolfe, and Gay Talese.


  • How did Lois revolutionize magazine cover design?



Lois joined Esquire magazine as a freelance art director in 1962. He was given complete creative freedom to design the covers as he saw fit. He decided to use the cover as a powerful tool to convey a message, a story, or an idea that would capture the attention and curiosity of the readers. He also wanted to challenge the conventions and expectations of magazine cover design at the time, which were often bland, boring, or predictable.


  • What were some of the most iconic covers by Lois?



Some of the most iconic covers by Lois include Muhammad Ali as Saint Sebastian (April 1968), Andy Warhol drowning in a can of soup (May 1969), Richard Nixon being made up as a clown (August 1970), Sonny Liston as Santa Claus (December 1963), and Germaine Greer as a sexy librarian (October 1971).


  • What impact and legacy did Lois's work have on the world of design and culture?



Lois's work for Esquire magazine had a huge impact on the world of design and culture. His covers were not only visually stunning and captivating, but also intellectually stimulating and socially relevant. His covers reflected the zeitgeist of the 1960s, capturing the mood, events, issues, and personalities of the decade. His covers also influenced other designers and publications, who adopted his style or tried to emulate his success. His covers also challenged social and political issues through his covers, such as racism, sexism, war, violence, religion, and censorship. His covers also inspired many people to think critically, creatively, and independently about the world around them. His covers also remain relevant and inspiring today.


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